Intensive Outpatient Program


The Counseling Center for Sexual Health is pleased to introduce our Intensive Outpatient Program (IOP) for adult males struggling with sexually related issues. This program provides ten hours of therapy a week for each client; including both individual and group therapy. Group sessions will be offered Tuesday and Thursday from 6-9pm, and Saturday from 9-12pm. Individual therapy will be scheduled per client.

There are many benefits for participating in an IOP. Perhaps the largest benefit is the continued support and treatment while individuals integrate life events (work, school, socialization) into a sober lifestyle.

CCSH professionals are sex therapists certified through the American Association of Sexuality Educators, Counselors and Therapists (AASECT) trained and skilled in ways to assist people in gaining a deeper understanding of their own sexuality and how it affects their lives in relationships.

If you believe you or someone you know would benefit from our Intensive Outpatient Program or Psychological services, please call the Counseling Center for Sexual Health intake department (805)308-9800 Ext. 3.

-Darilyn Shano, M.S., MFTI

Ashley Madison Scandal

ashley madison pic

First ask yourself, “What is Ashley Madison?” If you can confidently answer the question with anything but, “I do not know,” then you may have been affected by this site.

Ashley Madison is the second largest online dating website, second only to, with the slogan, “Life is Short. Have an Affair.” Recently a hacker group called, “The Impact Team,” threatened to release the “confidential” information for dating websites: Ashley Madison, Cougar Life, and Established Men. The goal behind the threat was to have these websites permanently shut down because the “cheating dirtbags,” according to the Impact team, were not worthy of discretion or confidentiality.

“Cheating dirtbags,” does not exactly insinuate the Impact Team is composed of men; and coincidently Christian Mingle did not get hacked. Does this information shed some light on who orchestrated the attack? Maybe, maybe not.

The more important questions are: What lead up to the affair?; Is there a history of similar sexually acting out behavior?;  What happens to the relationship now?; How do you cope with the onslaught of emotions ranging from fear to shame?

Millions of relationships and families have been affected by this threat of exposure. You are not the only one and you do not need to deal with this alone.

If you have been affected by the recent events involving Ashley Madison and other sites, the Counseling Center for Sexual Health can help. We work with individuals, couples, and partners of individuals affected. Contact us today (805)308-9800.

-Darilyn Shano, M.S., MFTI

Thought Stopping Techniques

Thought Stopping Techniques


Thought Stopping

The only way to ensure that a thought won’t lead to a relapse is to stop the thought
before it leads to craving. Stopping the thought when it first begins prevents it from
building into an overpowering craving. It is important to do it as soon as you realize
you are thinking about using.

To start recovery, it is necessary to interrupt the trigger–thought–craving–use
sequence. Thought stopping provides a tool for disrupting the process.
This process is not automatic. You make a choice either to continue thinking about
using (and start on the path toward relapse) or to stop those thoughts.

Thought-Stopping Techniques
Try the techniques described below, and use those that work best for you:

Visualization. Imagine a scene in which you deny the power of
thoughts of use. For example, picture a switch or a lever in your mind.
Imagine yourself actually moving it from ON to OFF to stop the
using thoughts. Have another picture ready to think about in place
of those thoughts.

Relaxation. Feelings of hollowness, heaviness, and cramping in the stomach are
cravings. These often can be relieved by breathing in deeply (filling lungs with air)
and breathing out slowly. Do this three times. You should be able to feel the tightness
leaving your body. Repeat this whenever the feeling returns.

Call someone. Talking to another person provides an outlet for your feelings and
allows you to hear your thinking process. Have phone numbers of supportive,
available people with you always, so you can use them when you need them.

-Katie McGrath, M.S.

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